Traveler Writer Photographer

Taking a break from coastal Rimini, the BlogVille crew headed out to three small towns nearby in Emilia-Romagna: Savignano sul Rubicone, San Mauro Pascoli and Santarcangelo di Romagna.

Unlike eternal dictator Julius Caesar, I crossed the Rubicon in Savignano sul Rubicone after I had already invaded Rome. Today, a small bridge and accompanying statue marks the point where Caesar “tossed the dice” and ventured into Rome with his army. What once was a river is now a small stream surrounded by pretty houses and cobblestone streets.

Crossing the Rubicon - Caesar's bridge in Savignano sul Rubicone

Crossing the Rubicon - Julius Caesar statue in Savignano sul Rubicone

The odd combination of bees and bikes set our itinerary in San Mauro Pascoli, where a visit to the bee farm and honey producer Miele Praconi coincided with the arrival of a large crew of motorcycle enthusiasts. The buzzing of bees was overpowered by the roar of Harley-Davidsons and other shimmering rides. Inside, the friendly staff treated us to samples of their sweet honey and a delicious local red wine called La Cagnoina by Fatteria Mula d’Oro.

Motorcycles at Miele Praconi in San Mauro Pascoli

Bee farming and honey at Miele Praconi in San Mauro Pascoli

Bee farming and honey at Miele Praconi in San Mauro Pascoli

Bee farming and honey at Miele Praconi in San Mauro Pascoli

The quest for tagliatelle al ragù led us to Trattoria Renzi, where they specialize in the local dish. Indeed, it seemed to be the only thing anyone was ordering at the restaurant. With a meaty sauce slowly simmered into the freshly made tagliatelle, it was one of the most delicious pasta dishes I’ve ever had (the addition of lard, no doubt, helps). A trip into the kitchen explains why; the cooks are all vibrant Italian moms.

Tagliatelle al ragù at Trattoria Renzi in Santarcangelo di Romagna

Making tagliatelle al ragù in the kitchen of Trattoria Renzi in Santarcangelo di Romagna

We continued to explore Santarcangelo di Romagna after the satisfying meal. As it was the Festa della Republica, most of the shops were closed; the residents most likely at the beach. It was empty. This made the walk through the (dare I say it) “picturesque” town almost surreal. The well-maintained buildings of bright colors and the large amount of flowers added to the romance of the city, and I don’t think I’ve ever seen a more “perfect” place.

The streets of Santarcangelo di Romagna

The streets of Santarcangelo di Romagna

The streets of Santarcangelo di Romagna

The streets of Santarcangelo di Romagna

The streets of Santarcangelo di Romagna

The streets of Santarcangelo di Romagna

The streets of Santarcangelo di Romagna

The streets of Santarcangelo di Romagna

The streets of Santarcangelo di Romagna

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=504495813 Patsy Tomkins

    I can’t wait to get to Italy every time I read your posts! Beautiful photos again :)

    • http://keane.li/ keane

      You are so kind :) Thanks for inspiring me to write, Patsy!

  • http://twitter.com/KMenozzi Kimberly Menozzi

    As if I weren’t homesick enough! Lovely photos, though. Glad you’re enjoying one of the most beautiful parts of Italy.

    • http://keane.li/ keane

      Thank you for your comment, Kimberly! Glad you liked the photos :) It’s my first time in Emilia-Romagna and I’m finding it extremely beautiful (and filling-I’m so full from last night…).

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